Girl in Therapy

A BIT ABOUT COGNITIVE BEHAVIOURAL THERAPY

"Your mind is the garden, your thoughts are the seed, you can choose to grow flowers or weeds"

Cognitive Behavioural Therapy or CBT, is a family of talking therapies, all based on the idea that thoughts, emotional feelings, behaviour, and how our bodies feel, are all connected. If we change one of these we can alter all the others.


When we’re low or upset, we often fall into patterns of thinking and responding which can worsen how we feel. CBT works to help us notice and change problematic thinking styles or behaviour patterns so we can feel better. 

CBT is mainly concerned with how we think and act now, although sometimes our current difficulties are related to things which have happened in our past, and so these might also be part of what we talk about.

Goals for therapy are set together with the therapist after talking things through to properly understand the problem. CBT is a collaborative therapy - it’s not something that is done to someone, it’s a way of working together with a CBT therapist.

CBT works best when it involves working on things in between sessions as well as during them. Tasks will be planned together.

As the therapy comes to an end the client and therapist will think together about how the client can continue using CBT techniques in daily life after treatment to continue to improve quality of life.

 
Attentive Therapist

A BIT ABOUT PERSON-CENTERED THERAPY

Person-centred therapy, also known as person-centred or client-centred counselling, is a humanistic approach that deals with the ways in which individuals perceive themselves consciously, rather than how a counsellor can interpret their unconscious thoughts or ideas.

The person-centred approach ultimately sees human beings as having an innate tendency to develop towards their full potential. However, this ability can become blocked or distorted by certain life experiences, particularly those experiences which affect our sense of value. 

The core purpose of person-centred therapy is to facilitate our ability to self-actualise - the belief that all of us will grow and fulfil our potential. This approach facilitates the personal growth and relationships of a client by allowing them to explore and utilise their own strengths and personal identity. The counsellor will aid this process, providing vital support to the client as they make their way through this journey.

The person-centred counsellor is not an expert; rather the client is seen as an expert on themselves and the person-centred counsellor encourages the client to explore and understand themselves and their troubles.